Novel Quantitative Approaches in Functional and Structural Imaging of Normal Aging Brain and Neurodegenerative Disorder: Part III. Clinical Applications of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

  • Chetsadaporn Promteangtrong Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Marcus Kolber Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Priya Ramchandra Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Ahmad Rajaa Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Sina Houshmand Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Thomas J. Werner Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Manouchehr Seyedi Vafaee Department of Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital; Clinical Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
  • Abbas Alavi Department of Radiology, DiDepartment of Radiology, Divisions of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USAvisions of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

Abstract

As investigators understand more in neurophysiology and biomedical physics, many advances are being concurrently made in Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that provide both imaging and quantitative analysis. These techniques offer researchers with powerful approaches to better relate brain structure and function. Volumetric MR and Voxel based morphometry (VBM) allow more accurate analysis than visual assessment. New imaging modalities such as Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Magnetization Transfer Imaging (MTI) can detect white matter abnormalities not seen with conventional MRI. Finally, ASL MRI has been shown to calculate absolute CBF as comparable to H152O PET, but with the added benefit of no radiation exposure. These novel MR-based techniques will facilitate the application of MRI for research and clinical practice and will continue to be refined to become more specific and accurate in the coming years.

Author Biography

Abbas Alavi, Department of Radiology, DiDepartment of Radiology, Divisions of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USAvisions of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

Published
2020-10-09
Section
Review Article