Novel Quantitative Approach in Functional and Structural Imaging of Brain in Normal Ageing and Neurodegenerative Disorders: Part II. Clinical Applications of Positron Emission Tomography

  • Chetsadaporn Promteangtrong Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Marcus Kolber Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Priya Ramchandra Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Ahmad Rajaa Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Sina Houshmand Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Thomas J. Wernera Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Manouchehr Seyedi Vafaee Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark; Neurosciences Research Center (NSRC), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Alireza Majdi Neurosciences Research Center (NSRC), Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Abbas Alavi Department of Radiology, Divisions of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA

Abstract

Aging results in measureable alterations in brain anatomy and function. Several theories about
the origins of brain aging have been developed. Inflammation, replicative senescence, continuous
shortening of chromosomes (telomere theory), and oxidative stress, are amongst factors affecting
life span. Also, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are the two most common agerelated
neurodegenerative disorders. As a highly prevalent health problems, the accurate identification
of these disorders is challenging. Modern functional and structural imaging such as positron emission
tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might allow investigators to better understand
pathophysiologic changes in AD and PD. However, these technics have several flaws which limit their use
in clinical settings. Here, we deep dive into the existing and novel quantitative approaches of PET imaging
for normal aging and its applications in neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and PD.

Published
2018-09-10
Section
Review Article