Comparison of Visual Evoked Potentials in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis and its Association with Blood Biochemical Profile

  • Sima Abedi Azar
  • Mahnaz Talebi
  • Aliakbar Taheraghdam
  • Rana Haghighat Shishavan
  • Sasan Andalib Neurosciences Research Center (NSRC), Imam Reza Medical Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Abstract

Purpose: Cranial nerve is one of optic nerves to be influenced by uremia. The symptoms can be diagnosed by Visual Evoked Potential (VEP) tests. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis upon VEP results and assess the association of VEP results with the results of blood biochemical tests and dialysis duration.

Methods: VEP was assessed in 30 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, 29 patients undergoing hemodialysis and 40 healthy controls. Moreover, blood biochemical tests involving urea, ceartinine, potassium, cholesterol, triglyceride, hemoglobin, hematocrit, albumin, parathormon (PTH) were carried out in all subjects.

Results: In comparison with the control group, there were exclusively significant prolonged N140 and P100 latencies in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis group; notwithstanding nonsignificant P100 amplitude and N75 latency. Durations of renal failure and dialysis were not associated with VEP parameters. Of the blood biochemical parameters, P100 latency in the right eyes and N140 latency in the left eyes were exclusively associated with serum potassium.

Conclusion: The present study suggests that optic pathway can be affected by chronic renal failure; even so, there would be no marked difference in optic pathway involvement between patients undergoing hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. This may indicate the equal effects of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis upon subclinical damages of optic pathway.

Author Biography

Sasan Andalib, Neurosciences Research Center (NSRC), Imam Reza Medical Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Published
2014-07-08
Section
Original Article